Clouds

When tiny droplets of moisture condense (join together) in cold air, they form clouds.

You can often work out what the weather will do next by studying the: height, shape and colour of the clouds.
  • Cumulus means fine weather. They are white and fluffy.
Church Way - geograph.org.uk - 571411
  • Stratus is usually a layer of thin, pale grey cloud covering the whole sky. It is often a sign of light rain or drizzle.
High Stratus nebulosus
  • Large, dark cumulonimbus clouds usually mean storms. Some have white tops like cauliflower heads and may mean storms.
Cumulonimbus - geograph.org.uk - 497799
  • Cirrus are usually wispy and streaky. They are a sign of wind. They float very high up and are made of ice crystals.
Cirrus or Mares tails - geograph.org.uk - 1591457

Clouds make places become cooler during the day because they block some of the Sun's rays. At night they trap in heat and keep the air warm. Blocking out or trapping heat is called insulation.

Fog and mist are clouds close to the ground, that often stay still and reduce visibility. 

Withernsea Fog - geograph.org.uk - 241721